Monday, January 11, 2016

Installation of a Clear, Acrylic Backsplash - Plus a Low-Pressure Tap

Returning from the south over the holiday break also presented a few other opportunities - items I had ordered before leaving were now ready for installation!

First up - protecting the wall behind the counter from inadvertent drips and splashes.  I didn't want to hide the look of our wood walls, but I didn't feel confident in treating them with anything that I've had previous experience with.  That's why I once again looked up my good friend Larry at Surecraft Plastics.  I took a crude diagramme that we both looked over together, and over Christmas he managed to get two pieces cut for me.

They consisted of a clear piece with holes pre-drilled to put along the wall under our hanging cabinet.  To the surface of this piece I added a hanging bar from Ikea to support their hanging drying rack and cutlery cup.  It looked just how I envisioned!

So pristine and shiny.
And with the drying rack!
I drilled a small hole in the corner of the drip tray under the Ikea drying rack - this allows much of the water to run out harmlessly, so I don't have to try to unclip a tray full of water every few uses.

In the corner, he provided a piece of grey ABS that was shaped to fit the counter.  This covered up the water pipes extending out of the bottom of the water tank.  I still have to mount this piece, hopefully I can get to that today, as I have all the parts I need to proceed with that.

The other decision I had to make was between two taps that had arrived in the post.  One, expensive, from the U.K, - it had both hot and cold running levers, and was advertised to be compatible with very low pressure systems.  The other, cheap, I ordered on a lark from China.  It only had a single lever and was very no-frills.  Annoyingly, the Chinese one seemed a better option for our situation.  With only a single lever for cold water, I wouldn't have to cap the other side to prevent mishaps.  As well, the U.K. tap still sent the water through a very narrow hose before it got up to the spout.  The Chinese one allowed me to remove that hose, and screw my water line directly to the 1/2" connection on the base.  I then removed the aerator and replaced it with two small extensions, to ensure that it cleared the edge of the sink.  You see, the corner sink placed the tap halfway back in the triangle created between the two sinks, and this mean that it was close to six inches away from either sink...

These hoses are just too narrow for my tastes.
Chinese tap for the win!
Luckily the water flows nicely into both.  It does tend to drip a tiny bit back onto the splash area between the two basins, but of course, that's all solid, molded stainless steel anyway, so no harm.  I have a few absorbent cloths that I keep by the sink, and if it bothers me, I wipe the drops off right away.
Clears the edge pretty well, but I can always mop up any drips.
Looking good!
Things are coming together!  Having a kitchen(ette?) gives us much greater range and ability in our choices.  It was Kenny's birthday recently, and for the first time since we've moved, we were able to make our own pizza dough for his special supper!
We can bake again!
Kenny's Minecraft cake that he made!

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